Author Archives: Parul Bhatnagar

19
Jun

Be confident!

A Businessman was deep in debt and could not see any way out.

Creditors and Suppliers were demanding payments. He sat in the park, deep in thought, wondering if anything could save his company from bankruptcy.

Suddenly an old man appeared before him and asked, “I can see that something is troubling you seriously”.

After listening patiently the old man said,
“I believe I can help you”.
He asked the man his name, wrote out a cheque and put it into his hands saying,

“Take this money, meet me here exactly one year from today… and you can pay me back at that time”.

Then he turned and disappeared as quickly as he had come.

The businessman saw in his hands a cheque for $ 500,000… signed by Warren Buffet, one of the richest men in the world.

“I can erase my worries instantly” he realized.
But instead, the man decided to put the uncashed cheque in his safe, knowing that it might give him the strength to work out to save his business and to use this only in case of dire emergency.

With changed thinking he negotiated better deals, restructured his business and worked rigorously with full zeal and enthusiasm and got several big deals.

Within few months, he was out of debt and started making money once again.
Exactly one year later he returned to the park with the uncashed cheque.

As agreed, the old man appeared.

But just as the businessman was about to hand him back the cheque and share his success story, a nurse came running up and grabbed the old man.
“I’m so glad I caught him” she cried.
“I hope he hasn’t been bothering you much. He always escapes from the mental hospital and tells people that he is Warren Buffet”,

saying this she took the old man away.

The surprised man just stood there, stunned! All year long he had been dealing with thinking that
he had half a million dollars behind him…

It’s not the money, real or imagined that turns our life around. It is our Self-confidence that gives us the power to achieve anything & everything that we want.

Be confident!

********************- ******************************- *************

If you see it in spiritual context:
“कर्मण्येव- धिकारस्ते मा फलेषु कदाचन।
मा कर्मफलहेतु- र्भूर्मा ते संगोऽस्त्व- कर्मणि॥”

English translation:

You have the right to perform your actions, but you are not entitled to the fruits of the actions.

Do not let the fruit be the purpose of your actions, and therefore you won’t be attached to not doing your duty.

 

15
Jun

#Thought

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quote-it-s-incredibly-easy-to-get-caught-up-in-an-activity-trap-in-the-busy-ness-of-life-to-stephen-covey-69-56-13

 

It’s incredibly easy to get caught up in an activity trap, in the busyness of life, to work harder and harder at climbing the ladder of success only to discover that it’s leaning against the wrong wall.”-Stephen Covey

2
Jun

#HelpOthers #Ethics #Empathy #BasisOfHumanResource #Karma

2
Jun

#Ethics #integrity #Morals

2
Jun

Fight Till The End…..

Greetings to you on this Saturday Morning !!

Some years ago on a hot summer day in South Florida, a little boy decided to go for a swim in the old swimming hole behind his house.

In a hurry to dive into the cool water, he ran out the back door, leaving behind shoes, socks, and shirt as he went. He flew into the water, not realizing that as he swam toward the middle of the lake, that an alligator was swimming toward the shore. His mother in the house was looking out the window saw the two as they got closer and closer together.

In utter fear, she ran toward the water, yelling to her son as loudly as she could. Hearing her voice, the little boy became alarmed and made a U-turn to swim to his mother. It was too late. Just as he reached her, the alligator reached him.

From the dock, the mother grabbed her little boy by the arms just as the alligator snatched his legs. That began an incredible tug-of-war between the two. The alligator was much stronger than the mother, but she was much too passionate to let go. A farmer happened to drive by, heard her screams, raced from his truck, took aim and shot the alligator.

Remarkably, after weeks and weeks in the hospital, the little boy survived. His legs were extremely scarred by the vicious attack of the animal, and on his arms, were deep scratches where his mother’s fingernails dug into his flesh in her effort to hang on to the son she loved.

The newspaper reporter, who interviewed the boy after the trauma, asked if he would show him his scars. The boy lifted his pant legs.

And then, with obvious pride, he said to the reporter, “But look at my arms. I have great scars on my arms, too. I have them because my Mom wouldn’t let go. So they are precious to me.”

There are different ways that we can remember our difficult times. There are scars from many painful experiences. But the way we decide to remember them is what keeps us from seeing them as traumas or memories. I know its easier said than done, but lets try to make good memories rather than remember traumas out of our life experiences and…..

……..Enjoy weekend !!

21
May

Running short of time…

Many times, we make statement like “running short of time…” to avoid this every employee should work on Time-Management…

So here a Small guide on 11Hack to improve “Time-Management Skill”-

  1. Keep a diary or log of how you spend your time: employees should do this for a minimum of three days, while a couple of weeks would be best. It allows them to compare where time has been spent and what has been achieved to goals. Aquila (1992) says it also helps people see how much time is wasted on internal distractions, such as lack of confidence, lack of competency or perfectionism.
  2. Use the Pareto Principle: otherwise known as the 80/20 rule, the Pareto Principle contends that 80% of results come from 20% of the effort. This is a good point to reflect on after keeping a time diary. What do you do that’s actually getting results? What do you do that gets results, but is inefficient and probably isn’t worth doing?
  3. Planning makes you feel better: Macan (1994) found that planning behaviour had a positive correlation with perceived control over time, and perceived control over time is crucial to whether time management has a positive impact. So thinking about how you spend your day and how you can be more efficient is a good thing in itself.
  4. Bucket your tasks into long-term goals: instead of focusing on project-related goals, Schippers and Hogenes (2011) suggest linking all activity to outcome-driven, long-term goals e.g. ‘Fundraising, Recruitment, R&D,’ and making sure that everything you do contributes to one of these goals.
  5. Use a suitable tool for tracking tasks and goals: some people like using a tech-based solution, like Wunderlist or Todoist, while others like to-do lists (simple, using a notepad, or more complex, like Bullet Journal). The key thing for HR to get across is why tracking tasks and goals not only helps you achieve them more easily but takes the cognitive load off your mind.
  6. Chunk your time around your goals, rather than tasks: when an email comes in, put it into one of your goal buckets, as above. Then, when you are focused on Recruitment, or R&D, you can tackle all the emails in that bucket. This helps prevent you falling prey to multitasking, which actually makes you less productive and can lead to burnout.
  7. Use a chunking system for time management: the Pomodoro technique is the most commonly-known here, where each day is split into work tranches, each with a break in between, with longer breaks at strategic intervals. There are other systems, like Getting Things Done (GTD). These don’t work for everyone, and for many, they are most useful wheeled out when necessary, rather than adhered to regularly. But they are very useful weapons in the time management arsenal.
  8. Pick a location to suit your focus: we’ve discussed in the past how there are four things you need to do in the workplace – communicate, concentrate, collaborate, contemplate. Employees will be less efficient if they choose to concentrate in the noisiest part of the office. Of course, HR has a job to do here in encouraging autonomy in choosing the right work environment.
  9. Learn to give important things priority: in the modern workforce, some things look like they are priorities but aren’t – emails are the obvious example. But to be efficient with your time, you need to be crystal clear on your goals and the tasks that achieve them, and then imbue these tasks with a sense of urgency so you prioritise them above non-urgent tasks that superficially look urgent.
  10. Develop your focus and concentration: Success is down to two things: being effective (doing the right things) and being efficient (doing them well). Planning, goal-setting and task management help you be effective. But if you can’t achieve flow and focus, you’ll struggle to be efficient. Mindfulness and energy management can help employees improve their focus.
  11. Reset interpersonal expectations: time management methods are useful but environmental factors, such as colleagues’ expectations, exert pressures that are difficult to overcome. Many jobs are now so interdependent that without resetting expectations within teams it can be hard for employees to take control of their time. HR needs to provide line managers with the training to support teams in this area.

 

Original Post : https://www.investorsinpeople.com/resources/ideas-and-inspiration/11-time-management-techniques-share-employees

17
May

So You Were Wrong

I once worked for a boss who was never wrong, never made a mistake or a bad decision. All you had to do was ask him. To his staff he was Teflon-man. Nothing stuck to him and everything came sliding toward us.

Accountability was not a concept he practiced unless things turned out well and then, he claimed the credit. But if they didn’t, he immediately embarked on endeavors to identify someone responsible. Being called to his office typically meant he was looking for information and trying to decide whom to blame.

Justify. Justify. Justify. Like a battle cry, he commissioned reports, graphs, charts and enhanced documentation whenever his boss questioned him. He found it easier to dig his heels into a position than admit he might have been wrong or change his mind. Working for someone I couldn’t respect eventually led me to transfer departments.

But it still baffles me. People do make mistakes, they do trip up sometimes and they do, on occasion, speak or act in error. And while there’s nothing that says we should be happy about it when we do it ourselves, trying to act like it didn’t happen, covering up our mistakes, or trying to justify inaccurate positions leads nowhere.

Unlike that early boss of mine, people who are winning at working speak up and admit when they’ve made a mistake. They take accountability for fixing resulting problems. And even if they have to gather their courage and swallow hard, they acknowledge when they’re wrong.

One of the biggest mistakes you can make if you want to be winning at working is pointing fingers, blaming others or offering excuses. Sure it might work temporarily to deflect critique or shift accountability, but long term blame-games impact results, reduces credibility, and diminishes trust.

If you want sustained influence and results, own your decisions, choices, and actions. Admit when you’re wrong. Fix your mistakes. Then learn from them and move on. These are the signs of confident, accountable, initiative-filled people. And these are the people you want on your team.

There’s a story I love about the famed British economist, John Maynard Keynes, who was confronted by a young man after one of his lectures. The man insisted Keynes give him an explanation of why he contradicted himself with something written years before. “Well,” Keynes replied. “When I’m wrong, I change my mind.” Seems to me, that’s pretty good advice for work and for life.

Author –  

Link – https://www.nanrussell.com/index.php/blog/

17
May

Thoughtful Thursday !!

Thought For the day

 

Never-ruin-an-apology-with-an-excuse.-Benjamin-Franklin

5
Apr

Life Mantra : Just a year to Live

 

Anthony Burgess was 40 when he learned that he had only one year to live. He had a brain tumor that would kill him within a year. He knows he had a battle on his hands. He was completely broke at the time, and he didn’t have anything to leave behind for his wife, Lynne, soon to be a window.

Burgess had never been a professional novelist in the past, but he always knew the potential was inside him to be a writer. So, for the sole purpose of leaving royalties behind for his wife, he put a piece of paper into a typewriter and began writing. He had no certainty that he would even be published, but he couldn’t think of anything else to do.

“It was January of 1960,” he said, “and according to the prognosis, I had a winter and spring and summer to live through, and would die with the fail of the leaf.”

In that time Burgess wrote energetically, finishing five and a half novels before the year wad through (very nearly the entire lifetime output of E.M. Forster, and almost twice that of J. D. Salinger.) 

But Burgess did not die. His cancer had gone into remission and then disappeared altogether. In his long and full life as a novelist ( he is best known for A Clock-work Orange), he wrote more than 70 books, but without the death sentence from cancer, he may not have written at all.

Many of us are like Anthony Burgess, hiding greatness inside, waiting for some external emergency to bring it out. Ask yourself what you’d do if you had Anthony Burgess’s original predicament. “If I had just a year to live, how would I live differently? What exactly would I do?” 

22
Sep

Monday Mantra : Successful People Who Did Not Let Failure Define Them – Part 1

A wildlife presenter on the Discovery Channel

 

BEFORE:

After leaving school, he briefly considered joining the Indian Army and hiked in the Himalayan mountains of Sikkim and West Bengal. Eventually, he joined the Territorial Army and, after passing selection, served as a reservist with the SAS in 21 SAS Regiment (Artists) (Reserve), for three years until 1997.

In 1996, he suffered a free-fall parachuting accident in Zambia. His canopy ripped at 16,000 ft, partially opening, causing him to fall and land on his parachute pack on his back, which partially crushed three vertebrae. He later said: “I should have cut the main parachute and gone to the reserve but thought there was time to resolve the problem”. According to his surgeon, he came “within a whisker” of being paralyzed for life and at first it was questionable whether he would ever walk again. He spent the next 12 months in and out of military rehabilitation.

AFTER:

In a showcase of what pure determination and hard work can do, on 16 May 1998 he achieved his childhood dream climbed to the summit of Mount Everest, 18 months after breaking three vertebrae in a parachuting accident.

At 23, he was at the time among the youngest people to have achieved this feat. This is the inspirational story of the amazing Bear Grylls. He is known to the world as a television presenter for the Discovery Channel, with his own show called Man Vs. Wild.

About me
Creative-Enthusiastic-Positive and People oriented HR Professional. My 10 years in HR as an assistant, then generalist, and now manager, have allowed me to grow and develop professionally and as a leader. Currently I am working as a Sr. Human Resource Consultant with few Start-ups. I am helping them Strategically in building best HR Practices. I have experience in below areas of Human Resource – Talent Acquisition (Recruitment & Selection), HR Policies & Procedures, Talent Management (HR Generalist), Performance Management System and Training & Development.
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