Category Archives: Human Resources

19
Nov

Must Have Skills for a RECRUITER

Listening Skills: 

For a Recruitment Consultant it is important to be a great listener. Only if you listen carefully and thoroughly to both, the jobseeker and the client, you will be able to understand what their needs are. The more you listen to them, the more you will find out. The more you ask them, the more you will know. So, the better you know what the client and jobseeker are looking for, the easier it will be to find the perfect match. This will allow you to make better decisions and find the perfect match over and over again. 

Confidence: 

You need to be confident not just about yourself but also about the services you offer to your clients, companies as well as jobseekers. 

Marketing Skills: 

Knowing how to market and promote your services, expertise and knowledge effectively to clients and candidates is of utmost importance. If you have lots of candidates on your database but are not able to convince a company to hire any of them you will not close any deals. Your convincing, negotiation and selling skills are therefore crucial. No clients, no business – as simple as that.

Target-driven: 

The recruitment industry is particularly competitive and target-driven therefore it is essential that the recruiter can handle pressure very well, is target-oriented, ambitious and hungry for results. Recruitment agencies usually offer basic salaries and additional performance-related payments, also called OTE – on target earnings. If you are not a target driven person you should seriously reconsider whether this is the right job for you. 

Relationship building skills: 

A recruiter works in the “people business” and deals with a variety of different people on a daily basis. This person has to be a good connector, who loves to meet new people and knows how to use every opportunity to network and  to turn it into business results. Having great relationship building skills with all people involved in the process is therefore crucial. It will allow you to build trust and attract clients as well as jobseekers more easily. Once you gained their trust and they notice that you work professionally, effectively and reliably, they will come back again and again without looking any further. It will also save you time because you can focus on your existing clients rather than having to chase constantly new ones. Also don’t underestimate the good relationship you have built with your jobseekers. If they are happy with the job you were able to find for them, they will recommend you to their friends and family too, should they ever need a job in the future. 

Communication Skills:

Working in the “human resource” business requires from a recruiter to be a great communicator, no matter whether face to face, on the phone or via email. If things don’t turn out positively for a jobseeker than being straightforward is not always the right strategy in this case. You can’t tell a jobseeker “Your background and experiences don’t match our needs right now” or “You are a great candidate but unfortunately you just came at the wrong time.” There are situations in which a recruiter needs to prove that s/he is tactful, considerate and gracious in order to maintain a good corporate  as well as personal reputation. 

Multitasking: 

Since you deal with companies and candidates on a daily basis you will need to juggle multiple projects and tasks simultaneously. Keeping in mind the details of various jobs, companies and candidates is important in order to work efficiently as well as effectively. 

Time Management Skills:

Having great time management skills is essential because certain positions need to be filled urgently and getting your priorities right is paramount.  

Patience:

Sometimes you will need to be very flexible and patient because candidates or clients might want to reschedule their interview dates in the last minute. 

Speed:

Companies and jobseekers don’t just rely on one source for filling their positions or finding a job but multiple sources. Who acts quickly will therefore win in the end. The worst that can happen is that in the last minute a company might tell you that they already found a candidate or the candidate already found a job in another organisation. Thus, it’s not size that nowadays matters but speed. 

IT and Social Media Skills:

Nowadays also being familiar with various social media recruitment strategies and IT technologies will give any recruiter an edge and proves that you are a professional who keeps up with current trends and technologies. 

Body Language Skills:

Being able to interpret other peoples’ body language can be very beneficial because you will understand quicker how people feel and what they think without them telling you. 

Problem solving skills: 

You need to be a good problem solver because you might face situations which you never thought would come along the way. For example, people not turning up to their interviews, companies telling you that they already found another candidate, not finding any candidates for a certain position for a long time, etc.

Reliability: 

If you want to be perceived as a trustworthy professional you need to be reliable when it comes to punctuality, offering the services you promised within a certain timeframe etc. If you can’t keep up with small things nobody will trust you and offer you bigger challenges in the future.  

Team working Skills:

Sometimes you need to lead a team of other recruitment consultants or you need to work in a team in order to find the best candidate for a high calibre company. Knowing how to manage people in order to achieve a set goal is important; good communication between all team members will guarantee that misunderstandings and inefficiencies will be avoided.

21
Oct

The Hare and The Tortoise: New Version Unplugged

Everyone knows about the story of the tortoise and the hare. What most people don’t know is that the there are several valuable lessons on teamwork to be learnt from the story…

Long time ago, there was a tortoise and a hare who had an argument about who the faster runner was. They finally decided to take on one another on a race. As the race started, the hare sprinted ahead briskly for some time. Realizing that it will take some time for the tortoise to catch up with him, he decided to seek shelter from the sun under a tree before continuing the race. As he sat under the tree, he gradually fell asleep. The tortoise, crawling at a steady pace, eventually overtook him and won the race. The hare woke up and realized that his complacency cost him the trophy.

The moral of the story is that the determined, hardworking and steady paced people will eventually overtake the fast but complacent. We are all familiar with this story.

Someone recently added a continuation to this age old tale. It goes like this: The hare realized that he was over confident, complacent and took things too easily. He decided to have a re-match with the tortoise. The tortoise accepted his challenge. This time, the hare ran with all his might and didn’t stop until he crossed the finish line.

The moral of the story – Fast and consistent will always beat the slow and steady. But the story doesn’t end here.

This time, it was the tortoise that did the soul searching and he realized that if the hare didn’t stop, there is no way he will beat him. He thought hard and decided on a different course and he challenged the hare to another re-match. The hare, of course, agreed. With the lessons learnt from his previous failure in mind, the hare kept on running once the race started and didn’t stop until the route leads him to the bank of a river. He was taken by surprise and he did not know what to do, since he could not swim. There were no bridges in sight and no one to ask for directions. As he was cracking his head, thinking of ways to cross the river, the tortoise strolled slowly along, dived into the river, swam across it and ultimately, finished the race before the hare.

The moral of the story – Know your strengths and take on your competitors in areas of your core competency. The story still hasn’t ended.

With the hare and the tortoise spending so much time together racing, they have become rather good friends, they have also developed mutual respect for one another as they realized that they are both different and they have different strengths. They decided to race again, but this time, as a team. As the race started, the hare carried the tortoise and they sped to the river bank. There, they switched positions and the tortoise ferried the hare across the river. On the opposite bank, the hare again carried the tortoise and they crossed the finishing line together. They completed the race in a record time that both of them can never achieve if they were to do it alone. They also felt a greater sense of satisfaction than they’d felt earlier.

The moral of the story- It’s good to be individually brilliant and to have strong core competencies but unless you’re able to work in a team and harness each other’s core competencies, you’ll always perform below par because there will always be situations at which you’ll do poorly and someone else does well. Teamwork is mainly about situational leadership, letting the person with the relevant core competency for a situation take leadership. Being supportive team members is necessary for a team to advance.

There are more lessons on teamwork to be learned from this story. Note that neither the hare nor the tortoise gave up after failures. The hare decided to work harder and put in more effort after his failure. The tortoise changed his strategy because he was already working as hard as he could, but was not doing as well as he wished. Imagine how long it will take the hare to learn how to swim! Or for the tortoise to learn to run fast. In this day and age when the environment changes at lightning speed, we have to learn to work with people who have strengths in areas that we do not have.

It is the same in business, if we can collaborate with people who are experts in areas that we are not familiar with, we will realize that our market suddenly becomes bigger.

26
Sep

The Power of Focus – Keep Your Eyes on The Prize

Most of us never really focus because we don’t know the power of focus. We constantly feel a kind of irritating psychic chaos because we keep trying to think of too many things at once. There’s always too much up there on the screen.

There was an interesting motivational talk on this subject given by former Dallas Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson to his football player:

“I told them that if I laid a two-by four plank across the room, everybody there would walk across it and not fall, because our focus would be that we were going to walk that two-by-four. But if I put that same two-by-four plank 10 stories high between two buildings only a few would make it, because the focus would be on failing. Focus is everything. The team that is more focused today is the team that will win this game.”

Johnson told his team not to be distracted by the crowed, the media, or the possibility of losing, but to focus on each play of the game itself just as if it were a good practice session.

The Cowboys won the game by 52-17.

4
Sep

Secret – Successful Sales Manager

A friend of mine is a very successful sales manager. After he had carefully interviewed and then selected a new salesman, he would take to the salesman to a Cadillac dealership and insist that he trade in his old car for a new Cadillac. The salesman would usually balk at the idea. He would be frightened of the cost of the car and the huge monthly payment involved. But the sales manager would insist that he buy the Cadillac as a condition of employment.

What do you think happened afterwards? First, the salesman would driven the car home and wife would most have a heart attack when she saw that he had bought a new Cadillac. But after she had settled down, he would take her for a ride around the neighborhood in the new car. The neighbors would see them driving in a new Cadillac as he waved on the way past. He would park his new Cadillac in front of his house or in his driveway. People would come over and admire it. Gradually, imperceptibly, at a subconscious level, his attitude toward himself and his earning potential would begin to change.

Within a few days, he would begin to see himself as the kind of person who drove a new Cadillac. He would see himself as a big money earner in his field, one of the top performers in his industry. And time after time, almost without fail, the sales people in this organization became sales superstars. Their sales performance jumped and they earned more than they had ever before. Soon the payment on the new Cadillac was of no concern because their incomes were so much greater.

13
Aug

25 Most Important Interview Questions

1. Tell me about yourself.
Since this is often the opening question in an interview, be extra careful that you don’t run off at the mouth. Keep your answer to a minute or two at most. Cover four topics: early years, education, work history, and recent career experience. Emphasize this last subject. Remember that this is likely to be a warm-up question. Don’t waste your best points on it.

2. What do you know about our organization?
You should be able to discuss products or services, revenues, reputation, image, goals, problems, management style, people, history and philosophy. But don’t act as if you know everything about the place. Let your answer show that you have taken the time to do some research, but don’t overwhelm the interviewer, and make it clear that you wish to learn more.
You might start your answer in this manner: “In my job search, I’ve investigated a number of companies.
Yours is one of the few that interests me, for these reasons…”
Give your answer a positive tone. Don’t say, “Well, everyone tells me that you’re in all sorts of trouble, and that’s why I’m here”, even if that is why you’re there.

3. Why do you want to work for us?
The deadliest answer you can give is “Because I like people.” What else would you like-animals?
Here, and throughout the interview, a good answer comes from having done your homework so that you can speak in terms of the company’s needs. You might say that your research has shown that the company is doing things you would like to be involved with, and that it’s doing them in ways that greatly interest you. For example, if the organization is known for strong management, your answer should mention that fact and show that you would like to be a part of that team. If the company places a great deal of emphasis on research and development, emphasize the fact that you want to create new things and that you know this is a place in which such activity is encouraged. If the organization stresses financial controls, your answer should mention a reverence for numbers.
If you feel that you have to concoct an answer to this question – if, for example, the company stresses research, and you feel that you should mention it even though it really doesn’t interest you- then you probably should not be taking that interview, because you probably shouldn’t be considering a job with that organization.
Your homework should include learning enough about the company to avoid approaching places where you wouldn’t be able -or wouldn’t want- to function. Since most of us are poor liars, it’s difficult to con anyone in an interview. But even if you should succeed at it, your prize is a job you don’t really want.

21
Jun

The Difference Between Managers and Leaders

It’s time to face the music as a manager: You don’t always have all of the right answers. Your “it’s my way or the highway” approach to management isn’t going to encourage anyone to help you in your problem solving endeavors.

Managers and leaders are often referred to synonymously, but only leaders allow their employees to solve problems with their own insight. The truth of the matter is this: Every leader may not be a manager, but every manager should be a leader. It’s easy to see that leadership and management aren’t the same thing, but a manager who lacks effective leadership traits will drive a business into the ground faster than you can count to 10.

Change doesn’t happen overnight when it comes to transforming managers into leaders. It takes time and energy to improve the way you manage and utilize more leadership characteristics on a daily basis.

Here are some tips to help you make the necessary improvements:

1. Managers give answers, leaders ask questions. There’s nothing certain to turn your employees against you faster than shouting orders at them. Why not spare yourself the impending resentment and simply ask your employees this: “What would you do?” or “What do you think of this idea?” Allowing people to participate in the decision-making process will not only transform what could have been an order into something more easily swallowed–it also inspires creativity, motivation, and autonomy.

2. Managers criticize mistakes, leaders call attention to mistakes indirectly. It may seem more efficient to point out your employees’ mistakes directly, but this will only leave them feeling embarrassed and frustrated. You should really be giving them the chance to learn and grow from through your critiques. Instead, give your employees the chance to address their mistakes.

For example, say a project was sent to a client and you receive back a disgruntled message. Calmly ask your employee about the clients concern and whether they feel what was provided was on par. This will give them a chance to provide their input, while also improving for the future.

3. Managers forget to praise, leaders reward even the smallest improvement. Praise pays off when it comes to increasing the overall success of your company. Finding time to recognize your employees for even the smallest accomplishment will only increase their interest in what they do. If you’re interested in ensuring your employees take pride in all that they do, regular feedback and recognition is certain to do the trick. Everyone wants to be genuinely appreciated for their efforts.

4. Managers focus on the bad, leaders emphasize the good. This really comes down to seeing the cup half empty or half full. If you’re only willing to point out the flaws of a project or an employee, you’re not giving them much interest in learning or improving. Instead, create a sandwich effect. Start with some form of praise, follow with the criticism, and end with praise.

5. Managers want credit, leaders credit their teams. Managers who lack leadership abilities are always first to take credit. But effective leaders understand the importance of crediting their teams for the big wins. This pays off in the long run for creative a workplace with a more positive company culture and employees who are driven toward more successes as a team.

Management shouldn’t be approach through force, but rather through influence. Put these techniques in place to improve the way your employees perform.

2
Jan

New Year Wishes – 2013

New Year Wishes – 2013
11
Oct

Thought For The Day

Thought For The Day
11
Oct

The Cockroach Theory

The Cockroach Theory for Self-development Response Vs Reaction

At a restaurant, a cockroach suddenly flew from somewhere and sat on a lady. She started screaming out of fear. With a panic stricken face and trembling voice, she started jumping, with both her hands desperately trying to get rid of the cockroach.

Her reaction was contagious, as everyone in her group also got panicky.

The lady finally managed to push the cockroach away but …it landed on another lady in the group.

Now, it was the turn of the other lady in the group to continue the drama.

The waiter rushed forward to their rescue.
In the relay of throwing, the cockroach next fell upon the waiter.

The waiter stood firm, composed himself and observed the behavior of the cockroach on his shirt.
When he was confident enough, he grabbed it with his fingers and threw it out of the restaurant.

Sipping my coffee and watching the amusement, the antenna of my mind picked up a few thoughts and started wondering, was the cockroach responsible for their histrionic behavior?
If so, then why was the waiter not disturbed?
He handled it near to perfection, without any chaos.

It is not the cockroach, but the inability of the ladies to handle the disturbance caused by the cockroach that disturbed the ladies.

I realized that, it is not the shouting of my father or my boss or my wife that disturbs me, but it’s my inability to handle the disturbances caused by their shouting that disturbs me.

It’s not the traffic jams on the road that disturbs me, but my inability to handle the disturbance caused by the traffic jam that disturbs me.

More than the problem, it’s my reaction to the problem that creates chaos in my life.

Lessons learnt from the story:
I understood, I should not react in life.
I should always respond.
The women reacted, whereas the waiter responded.

Reactions are always instinctive whereas responses are always well thought of, just and right to save a situation from going out of hand, to avoid cracks in relationship, to avoid taking decisions in anger, anxiety, stress or hurry.

Have a nice day.

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17
Aug

Self Appraisal

A little boy went to a telephone booth which was at the cash counter of a
store and dialed a number.
The store-owner observed and listened to the conversation:

Boy : “Lady, Can you give me the job of cutting your lawn?
Woman : (at the other end of the phone line) “I already have
someone to cut my lawn.”
Boy : “Lady, I will cut your lawn for half the price than the
person who cuts your lawn now.”
Woman : I’m very satisfied with the person who is presently cutting
my lawn.
Boy : (with more perseverance) “Lady, I’ll even sweep the
floor and the stairs of your house for free.
Woman : No, thank you.

With a smile on his face, the little boy replaced the receiver. The
store-owner, who was listening to all this, walked over to the boy.

Store Owner : “Son… I like your attitude; I like that positive
spirit and would like to offer you a job.”
Boy : “No thanks,
Store Owner : But you were really pleading for one.
Boy : No Sir, I was just checking my performance at
the job I already have. I am the one who is working for that lady I was
talking to!” *

This is called –

“Self Appraisal”

About me
Creative-Enthusiastic-Positive and People oriented HR Professional. My 10 years in HR as an assistant, then generalist, and now manager, have allowed me to grow and develop professionally and as a leader. Currently I am working as a Sr. Human Resource Consultant with few Start-ups. I am helping them Strategically in building best HR Practices. I have experience in below areas of Human Resource – Talent Acquisition (Recruitment & Selection), HR Policies & Procedures, Talent Management (HR Generalist), Performance Management System and Training & Development.
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